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beckisbookshelf:

Also, apparently just standing and staring at your bookshelves doesn’t make room for all the books you just bought.

(via jojoinabox)

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stitch-the-geek:

OMG GUYS THAT WAS ONE TIME

(Source: , via ataleofnerdybusiness)

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tastefullyoffensive:

[cyanide&happiness]
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lancecharleson:

joeywaggoner:

squigglydigg:

smokingladiesman submitted:

Disney’s tribute to Robin Williams at the end of Aladdin. 

That’s… actually really beautiful.  Well done, Disney.

I actually watched Aladdin on Disney Channel a few days ago and not only did they show this image at the end of the film but they showed the entire movie completely commercial free. That’s how much they appreciated him.
Well done Disney, well done.

Now that’s some grade A respect from Disney right there.

lancecharleson:

joeywaggoner:

squigglydigg:

 submitted:

Disney’s tribute to Robin Williams at the end of Aladdin. 

That’s… actually really beautiful.  Well done, Disney.

I actually watched Aladdin on Disney Channel a few days ago and not only did they show this image at the end of the film but they showed the entire movie completely commercial free. That’s how much they appreciated him.

Well done Disney, well done.

Now that’s some grade A respect from Disney right there.

(via jojoinabox)

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staxilicious:

artkat:

despairnaegami:

personasanta:

does anybody else think tired and sleepy mean two totally different things

sleepy is cute and dozing off and happy but tired is 10 cups of coffee and murder

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reblogging because the last graphic comment is FLAWLESS

(Source: bingeeaterghoul, via booksblanketsandtea)

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"

Here are three elements we often see in town names:

If a town ends in “-by”, it was originally a farmstead or a small village where some of the Viking invaders settled. The first part of the name sometimes referred to the person who owned the farm - Grimsby was “Grim’s village”. Derby was “a village where deer were found”. The word “by” still means “town” in Danish.

If a town ends in “-ing”, it tells us about the people who lived there. Reading means “The people of Reada”, in other words “Reada’s family or tribe”. We don’t know who Reada was, but his name means “red one”, so he probably had red hair.

If a town ends in “-caster” or “-chester”, it was originally a Roman fort or town. The word comes from a Latin words “castra”, meaning a camp or fortification. The first part of the name is usually the name of the locality where the fort was built. So Lancaster, for example, is “the Roman fort on the River Lune”.

"

A Little Book of Language by David Crystal, page 173. (via linguaphilioist)

woah!

(via submariet)

(via nissancubes)

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"Bad books on writing tell you to ‘WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW’, a solemn and totally false adage that is the reason there exist so many mediocre novels about English professors contemplating adultery."

— Joe Haldeman (via maxkirin)

(via maxkirin)

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"Ice circles," a rare natural phenomenon that occurs in slow moving water in cold climates. They are thin and circular slabs of ice that rotate slowly in the water.
Gary Lane

"Ice circles," a rare natural phenomenon that occurs in slow moving water in cold climates. They are thin and circular slabs of ice that rotate slowly in the water.

Gary Lane

(Source: vvolare, via nissancubes)

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follow the nerd this was reblogged from

(Source: s-un-rise, via nissancubes)

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fregg:

01091006:

つづき

#this look like an anime opening
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idreamofjimmy:

Sheen Estevez, Ace Attorney

(via iwannahaveapretenddanceparty)

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hellaoptile:

you know how when you go to a concert or show of some sort and the person on stage is like “HOW’S EVERYONE DOING TONIGHT?!?!?!?!” and the audience cheers back? why? you’re not answering the question, you’re just yelling. imagine if we did that in daily conversation. “hey jeff, how are ya?” and jeff just starts screaming and clapping in your face

(Source: stupidsexyganondorf, via thegirloffandoms)

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doctorcapaldies:

3 Days To Go (x)

(via doctorwho)